Daily Bulletin 9/18/17

Monday, September 18, 2017

Student Announcements

HOT LUNCH MENU

MONDAY
Chicken Taquitos
Winter Mix
Chilled Mandarin Orange
Apple Juice
Milk
TUESDAY
Cheeseburger
Baked Beans
Jo-Jo’s
Fresh Grapes
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Chicken Fried Beef Sticks with Roll
Mashed Potatoes w/Gravy
Golden Corn
Diced Peaches
Milk
THURSDAY
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce
Garlic Toast
Romaine Salad w/Ranch Dressing
Banana
Orange Juice
Milk
FRIDAY
Pizza
Green Beans
Lattice Cut Sweet Potato
Chilled Applesauce Cup
Milk
Lunch Workers for Sept. 18th-22nd: Landon Pe’a, Hanna Buckmaster, Bethany Doepken, Wally Wallace

NEW NEWS:

OLDER NEWS:

PARENT NEWS:

Find breakfast and lunch menus online at kpbsd.org under sub-title “Parents”

To pay sports fees and/or check balance on your child’s food service account: (you will get your child’s Power School log on at our Open House/Chili Feed this Thursday, August 31st, 5:30 PM.)
Log into Powerschool
Click on lunch and fees
Click on “Lunch planner” for lunch or “fees” to pay for sports fees

PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD! Anyone who wants to substitute for Seward area schools can use the following link to sign up and take the online sub training. http://www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us/departments.aspx?id=21717

LEARNING CORNER

WORD OF THE DAY: bungalow n.
Definition: 1. a small house or summer cottage, usu. of one or one and a half stories, sometimes with a veranda.
Example: My parents rented a bungalow on the beach for our summer vacation.
Synonyms: cabin, cottage, hut

FACT OF THE DAY:

Living underground and mostly out of sight, squiggly earthworms seem like such humble, mundane organisms — that is, unless it’s Australia’s Giant Gippsland earthworm, which is believed to be the world’s largest species of worm. Found only in the Bass River Valley of South Gippsland, the Giant Gippsland worm measures on average 3.3 feet long, and 0.79 inches in diameter, and weighs about 0.44 lb., however, these long-lived invertebrates can survive up to 5 years or more, maturing to a whopping 9.8 feet in length.
Highly sensitive to aboveground vibrations, the Giant Gippsland responds to unknown intruders’ footsteps by moving away, producing audible squelching noises that can be clearly heard on the surface.
The Giant Gippsland worm is currently classified as a protected species, its numbers having been reduced by the introduction of agriculture into this region of Australia. Other limiting factors include its low rate of reproduction and slow development — the giant worm produces one large egg capsule of 4 to 7 centimeters (2.75 inches) in length, which takes one year to incubate into a single offspring.

DATES TO REMEMBER
Sept. 26 PICTURE DAY

This entry was posted in School Bulletin. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply