Monday, October 2, 2017

Monday, October 2, 2017       

          

 Student Announcements   

 

                                   

cid:image001.png@01D298A9.8EF595C0HOT LUNCH MENU

 

MONDAY

Chicken Fried Beef Stick w/ Roll

Mashed Potato w/ Gravy

Gold Rush Fruitable Juice

Sugar Snap Peas w/ Ranch

Chilled Applesauce

TUESDAY

Taquitos

Romaine Salad

Green Beans

Chilled Mandarin Oranges

 

 

Lunch Workers for Oct. 2nd-6th:   Hayden Buckmaster, Layla O’Brien, Rider Allen, Donna Hinders

 

 

NEW NEWS: 

 

Image result for library book children readingAnnouncing the return of Open Library! Third-, fourth- and fifth-graders are invited to come to the library during recess on Wednesdays and Fridays if they have permission from their teachers. This is a place for fairly quiet and calm activities, like reading, drawing and coloring, games and puzzles, Legos, origami, computers, catching up on assignments, etc.

 

 

Image result for free soccer imageSOCCER BEGINS TOMORROW, OCTOBER 3RD!  IF YOU HAVEN’T FILLED OUT A REGISTRATION PACKET THIS YEAR, BE SURE AND STOP BY THE OFFICE AND PICK ONE UP.  TURN YOUR PACKET AND FEE IN BY THE FIRST PRACTICE.                                                                         

 

 

Healthy Futures window clingDon’t forget about your September Healthy Futures Challenge!  Only 2 DAYS TO go.  Remember to mark off any days that you have spent at least 60 minutes during the day engaging in physical activity (PE and Recess count!) Logs are due in the folders by Mrs. Lyon’s or Mrs. Jones’ rooms by October 4th.  Get out and Play!!

 

 

OLDER NEWS:    

 

 

PARENT NEWS:  

 

Find breakfast and lunch menus online at kpbsd.org under sub-title “Parents”

 

To pay sports fees and/or check balance on your child’s food service account:  (you will get your child’s Power School log on at our Open House/Chili Feed this Thursday, August 31st, 5:30 PM.)

Log into Powerschool 

Click on lunch and fees

Click on “Lunch planner” for lunch or “fees” to pay for sports fees

 

PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD!  Anyone who wants to substitute for Seward area schools can use the following link to sign up and take the online sub training.         http://www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us/departments.aspx?id=21717

 

 

LEARNING CORNER

 

WORD OF THE DAY: moccasin n.

Definition: 1. a heelless shoe made entirely of soft leather, as deerskin, with the sole brought up and attached to a piece of U-shaped leather on top of the foot, worn orig. by American Indians. 2. a hard-soled shoe or slipper resembling this.

Example: Moccasins are very comfortable shoes.

Synonyms: shoe, footwear

 

FACT OF THE DAY:  

The Unconventional Life of Mary Walker, the Only Woman to Have Received the U.S. Medal of Honor!  On a summer day in 1866, Mary Edwards Walker exited a milliner’s store on Canal Street, in New York, and was promptly arrested. A report the following day stated, “The lady wore a long coat or robe and a pair of cloth pants, and the guardian of the public peace, imagining that there was something wrong about this, and that a lady ought not be allowed to dress as she pleases, undertook to arrest her.”

The 19th-century dress reform movement had started 16 years earlier with the “bloomer,” a billowing, tapered pant that had been adopted, briefly, by middle-class women as an alternative path to gender equality. The bloomer’s popularity was, for the most part, short-lived, largely on account of the ridicule and harassment faced by the women who wore them, but for Walker, a physician, dress reform was critical to women’s emancipation.

Consider the typical outfit for women of a certain class in the late 1850s: a chemise and drawers, a tight-fitting corset, a crinoline cage underskirt, petticoats, a dress, stockings, and slippers. The long skirts dragged in the dirt, spreading disease; crinolines were flammable; corsets were constricting; and fabrics were frequently dyed with arsenic. It was a hazardous and uncomfortable time for women’s fashion, and Walker wanted to change that.

Mary Walker grew up on a farm in Oswego, New York, into a family of abolitionists who emphasized education and equality. They were anti-alcohol and anti-tobacco, and her father believed corsets were damaging to health. After working as a teacher, Walker attended medical school in Syracuse and graduated, with honors, in 1855. At her wedding in 1856, she wore the “reform costume”—a skirt over pants—and she did not follow the traditional vows.

Walker began to lecture and contribute to a reform magazine and urged women to go forth free, sensible women with dress reform as her priority.

 

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DATES TO REMEMBER

 

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:   Image result for inspirational self worth quotes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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